World Mission Sunday

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the …

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula Read More »

World Mission Sunday

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed out the value of humility in doing a mission.

The bishop began his reflection by reminding the faithful of how God hears the cry of the poor and those who humble themselves are raised.

“Maraming mga kasabihan at kwento ni Jesus ay nagtatapos ng ganito: Ang nagmamataas ay binabagsak ng Diyos at ang nagpapakumbaba ay tinataas ng Diyos. Kaya maliwanag sa mga katuruan ni Jesus na namumuhi ang Diyos sa mga mayayabang at kinalulugdan niya ang mga mababa ang kalooban…. Ang panalangin ng mga mababa ang loob ay tumatagos sa langit at nakakarating sa Diyos,” the bishop said.

Bishop Pabillo mentioned that in the second reading, St. Paul spoke about what he has achieved for the faith and awaits his reward but not for himself but for those who believed in Christ.

“Sa ating ikalawang pagbasa, kinilala ni Pablo ang kanyang achievements: “I have completed the race well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” At ngayon nag-aantay na lang siya ng gantimpala ng katarungan mula sa Panginoon….” he said.

The Bishop said that the poor and meek are the ones who are often abused and taken advantaged on because of their status. But God loves these people.

“Ang mga dukha at mabababang loob na kinalulugdan ng Diyos ay iyong mga tao na kahit na sila ay naaapi ng iba o ng kanilang kalagayan sa buhay, sila ay umaasa pa rin sa Diyos, na mahal pa rin sila ng Diyos. Ang inaasahan nilang tutulong sa kanila ay ang Panginoon. Kaya patuloy silang tumatawag sa kanya at kinikilala din nila ang kanilang pagkukulang at kasalanan.”

The bishop clarified that these people do not solely rely on God’s grace alone but they work to earn a living and these people care more about those who are suffering like them.

“Hindi naman ito nangangahulugan na tumitingala na lang sila sa langit. Sila ay nagsisikap din na gumawa. Matulungin pa nga sila sa ibang nangangailangan. Dahil sa nararanasan nila ang magdusa, maunawain at mahabagin sila sa ibang nagdurusa,” he said.

Bishop Pabillo has called the faithful to help the missionaries in their duty to bring the gospel to those who have not heard it.

We are also reminded of our duties as missionaries to take part in spreading the Gospel.

“Ngayong Linggo ay World Mission Sunday. Pinapaalaala sa atin na patuloy pa ang gawain ng pagpapalagap ng kaharian ng Diyos sa buong mundo.”

“Tulungan natin ang mga misyonero. Ipagdasal natin sila na maging mabisa ang kanilang pamimisyon.” (Mio Angelo Hermoso/SOCOM-Vicariate of Santa Clara de Montefalco)

 

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor

On Sunday, October 23, 2022, the Catholic Church celebrated World Mission Sunday. In his homily during his mass in Palawan, Bishop Broderick, bishop of the Apostolic Vicariate of Taytay, pointed …

Bishop Pabillo reminds faithful: God hears the cry of the poor Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ,

“You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this year’s World Mission Sunday. When we talk about witness, the first thing that comes to mind is the powerful statement made by St. Paul VI forty-seven years ago, in 1975. He said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” (Evangelii Nuntiandi, 41) Almost fifty years later, it is still true, if not more relevant and compelling.

People today are no longer satisfied with words alone. We want to hear words backed up by concrete actions. We want a Church that walks the talk and puts into action what we preach. Young people, in particular, have a strong antenna for what is authentic and what is fake. They can easily detect if someone is a credible witness or an impostor. Not a few have drifted away from the Church because they felt that the so-called religious people are nothing but a collection of hypocrites and posers.

These are difficult observations to accept. But they have to be acknowledged. And we have to admit that many times, in our empty words without deeds, we fail to be witnesses to the teachings of Jesus Christ. Like the proud Pharisee in the Gospel today, we only see our own righteousness and look down on others who are not like us. We don’t see ourselves as the tax collector, a sinner who is in need of God’s mercy and love.

To be a witness is to be consistent in what we believe and how we live. To be a witness is to profess our faith with sincerity and to act accordingly. Failure to be faithful to our preaching leads to the erosion of our credibility and eventually throws us away into irrelevancy. This is the scourge of the Church today, especially of the clergy. Does our preaching still have power of the Spirit? Do our actions still reflect the authority of Jesus in the gospels? Are we still credible? Are we still relevant?

But the call to be a witness is not just for the clergy or religious. It is the call to all of us. So I would also ask all of you, dearly beloved faithful, are you witnessing to your faith? Do you share your faith with ease to your family, friends, co-workers, or even to strangers? Do you still make the sign of the cross before eating in the restaurants or riding in the jeepney or bus? Or have you become uncomfortable to do these simple gestures of showing your faith in Jesus? Have you become lukewarm or timid in upholding justice and the defense of the oppressed in our society as Sirach in our first reading would suggest to us?

I guess we are all in the same boat. We still have much to do in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith. Let us not be discouraged, however. Let us learn from St. Paul in our second reading who steadfastly held on to his faith in the face of his impending death. He tells Timothy, “The time of my departure is at hand. I have competed well. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith…Everyone deserted me. But the Lord stood by me and gave me strength, so that through me the proclamation may be completed and all the Gentiles might hear it.” Till the end, St. Paul and so many others like him have offered their lives to witness to their faith in Jesus. Indeed, the word for witness in Greek is “martus” or “marturia”. The same root word of the word martyr or martyrdom.

“You shall be my witnesses.” This is the same call of Jesus to all of us today. This is our mission. This is our life purpose. This is clear. But the real question begging for an answer is, “How can we be a witness?” How do we proclaim the “Euangelion” (Good News) that Jesus is alive and that He is present among us?

The answer lies in the quality and depth of our relationship with Jesus, our encounter and intimacy with Him. Sometimes we assume that because we have been baptized, confirmed and receive the sacraments regularly, we already have a relationship with Jesus. We have a living and operative faith when in fact we are just going through the motion of being a good Catholic. Like the pharisee in the Gospel today, we feel good about participating and giving to the Church but we have never really surrendered our lives to the Lord. We have not really intentionally decided to be his disciple and follower. And much less do we consider ourselves as a mission that He has placed in this world to obey His will and to glorify His name in everything that we do.

“You shall be my witnesses.” means that our life shall become a testimony to the new life that the Holy Spirit gives to us. That every day and everywhere we are ready to share the many beautiful things that God has done in our life. That like St. Lorenzo Ruiz, our first Filipino saint, we can bravely say,

Kahit maging sanglibo man
Ang buhay n’yaring katawan
Pawa kong ipapapatay,
Kung inyong pagpipilitang
Si Kristo’y aking talikdan.

Had I many thousands of lives I would offer them all for him. Never shall I apostatize. You may kill me if that is what you want. To die for God—such is my will.

Brothers and sisters, let the witness of San Lorenzo de Manila be our inspiration in becoming authentic witnesses to our faith in our world today. Let his “marturia” be our “kerygma” today and every day. Amen. (Photo by JP Gonzalo/Contributor | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m.

Msgr. Esteban Lo, our dear chaplain; dear brother priests; dearly beloved in Christ, “You shall be my witnesses.” (Acts 1:8) This is the theme chosen by Pope Francis for this …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Mass for World Mission Sunday 2022, Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord (SM Megamall), October 23, 2022, 11 a.m. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the Mass, dear deacons, seminarians, brothers and sisters in the Lord, our gospel for today for the World Mission Sunday is the story of Bartimaeus, the blind man from Jericho.

At first glance, it does not seem to be related to the theme of missions but in truth, there is a connection. After all, today’s passage has important things to say to us about prayer. And for many of us, it is especially through prayer that we express our support for our brothers and sisters who are working in the missions, striving to bring the good news of Christ’s salvific love.

In the gospel, the blind man, Bartimaeus, makes an intense and insistent prayer of supplication. He says, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” And he shouts even louder, “Son of David, have pity on me.” Now the prayer of supplication, the prayer of request has two essential elements and both of these elements appear in today’s gospel account.

The first is the awareness of needing the Lord. The blind in today’s gospel definitely has this awareness although it is rather confused. Bartimaeus knows that he needs his sight and so, he shouts out loud. He cannot keep quiet because he is aware of his miserable state and he wants to get out of it.

The second condition is trust. Without trust, there is no prayer. There will only be discouragement and desperation. However, if in our misery, there is trust then, we can pray. And that is why, Jesus tells Bartimaeus, “Your faith has saved you.” Indeed, the blind man’s awareness of his own misery is accompanied by faith in the power and in the mercy of the Lord. Bartimaeus prays, he shouts and then he is heard. And he is able to glorify God.

Dear friends, these two elements – awareness of one’s condition and trust in the Lord are important conditions in the prayer of supplication. The awareness of our miserable state should not bring us sadness because it is actually a premise, even a pre-requisite for authentic prayer. It makes us turn to God with a sincere plea to be healed. Indeed, we should not close ourselves in our misery, but instead, we must turn to God and say to him, “Lord, you see how miserable I am and how I need you. I believe that you and your goodness will pity me and heal me. Then our prayer will be heard and we can give praise to God for his infinite mercy.

Now, aside from teaching us how to make a prayer of supplication, today’s gospel also reminds us that prayer has a communal dimension. This is something that unfortunately we sometimes forget because quite often, we are simply concerned about ourselves. But prayer, if it is truly authentic …others, it involves others.

In the Lucan version of the same episode, Luke narrates that once the prayer of Bartimaeus is heard, it becomes a prayer of praise. And it widens to include others. The Lucan text says Bartimaeus followed him giving glory to God. When they saw this, all the people gave praise to God.

But even in Mark’s version, prayers communal aspect also emerges. Notice that the others play a role in bringing Bartimaeus to Jesus. The call of Jesus does not reach a blind man directly. Someone is tasked to transmit this. Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.” So, they called the blind man saying to him, “Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you.”

Dear friends, sometimes, when we are too absorbed with our own concerns, supplicating or praying to the Lord only for ourselves and our needs, we may tend to forget that we are also called to become concerned about others, to help others and to bring others to Christ. We are also on mission.

Take courage, get up. Jesus is calling you. We are called to encourage others, to give them hope, to boost their morale. We are called to help others to get up, to start a new and not to put them down. We are called to bring others to Christ to remind them that Jesus is calling them by name and that only Jesus can bring healing and meaning to our lives. We are also on mission.

Our gospel today clearly has important points to teach us about prayer. And it reminds us too, that we are on mission.

Dear brothers and sisters, as we pray for our own needs and concerns, let us also pray for our missionaries who are working in various parts of the world. May they persevere in their mission. May they lead many people to Jesus and may they all bear witness to the compassion on Christ, Amen. (RCAM-AOC | Photo by Rian Salamat/RCAM-AOC)

 

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday.

Reverend Msgr. Esteban Lo, LRMS, Chaplain of the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord here in SM Megamall and National Director of the Pontifical Mission Society, brother priests concelebrating in the …

FULL TEXT | Homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula during the Closing Mass of PCNE 8 Series 2 at the Chapel of the Eucharistic Lord on October 24, 2021, World Mission Sunday. Read More »

World Mission Sunday

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries.

This is what Manila Archbishop Jose Cardinal Advincula told the faithful as he celebrated the Holy Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Pontificio Collegio Filippino in Rome on October 22.

Cardinal Advincula invited the Filipino community present in the Eucharistic celebration to embrace the call of mission “with open hearts and willing spirits” as it is “a duty and privilege of every Christian”.

“Together as a Filipino community in Rome and in Italy, let us continue to be a shining light, a beacon of hope, and a testimony, a testament to the universal call to mission,” he said.

“Let us remember that our mission is not limited by borders for the love of Christ knows no boundaries,” he added.

Concelebrated with the Archbishop of Manila was Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) vice president and Pasig Bishop Mylo Hubert Vergara who stressed that Filipinos are serving as “exemplary witnesses of faith” around the world.

“And in so doing have shown them the value of prayer not only in their life as missionaries but also in our lives as Christians,” Bishop Vergara said.

Cardinal Advincula and Bishop Vergara, together with CBCP president and Kalookan Bishop Pablo Virgilio David are in Rome until October 29 for the first cycle of the Synod on Synodality. (Lem Leal Santiago/RCAM-AOC | Photo by Roy Lagarde/CBCPNews)

 

 

Mission for the Lord has no boundaries, says Cardinal Advincula

Mission, like Christ’s love, has no boundaries. This is what Manila Archbishop