Archbishop Advincula

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Indeed, our defense and promotion of a culture of life in our society today is not a short-term engagement or a temporary battle. From experience, we know that as long as there are subtle and not so subtle attacks against the family and human life, we will be there to register our firm objection and make sure that our united stand is heard.

Today, I would like to honor and appreciate all of you who have been at the forefront of our mission to proclaim the Gospel of Life, a message lovingly received day after day by the Church and preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture. For some of you, this has been your life-long task and advocacy. Thanks to all of you, missionaries for the Gospel of Life, we can fulfill our prophetic role in a rapidly changing world that is oftentimes more welcoming to a civilization of death and so hostile to a civilization of life and love. I encourage you to continue to be passionate in your ministry. Do not be disheartened if sometimes you feel that what you have been doing is not even noticed or ends up in an apparent failure. Take courage. You are not alone. As the prophet Isaiah said in the first reading, “The Lord will guide you alwaysand give you plenty even on the parched land.He will renew your strength,and you shall be like a watered garden,like a spring whose water never fails.”

The theme “Together, we walk for life,” is also a challenge for us to explore new pathways to respond better to the dominant values of our contemporary times. Kailangan na rin nating harapin ang katotohanan na napakaraming isyu sa pamilya at lipunan ngayon ang hindi na maaaring sagutin ng “Huwag ka nang magtanong. Sumunod ka na lang.” We need to engage in more listening and dialogue. This is part of walking for life. Yes, we are clear about our teachings on the different issues connected with life and family. But we also need to rethink our approaches, methodologies, and strategies. How do we deal with the dilemmas and complexities of modern families, the irregular situations in the home, the diversity in understanding identity and personhood, the wounds caused and inflicted because of polarization even in the home? Pope Francis has pointed us to the style of synodality so we can listen and discern together. It is important that all of us here in this walk must help each other to become a synodal Church in mission.

Jesus, in our Gospel today from St. Luke, gave us the best example of how to walk for life together. He dined and dialogued with the known sinners of His time. He called Levi, a tax collector, to follow Him. He attended the banquet which Levi prepared in his house. He had no problem being on the same table with a large crowd of tax collectors! He told the scribes and pharisees who were complaining about his impertinent behavior, “Those who are healthy do not need a physician, but the sick do.

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.” We must have the same boldness and audacity of Jesus. If we want to walk together for life, we must learn to be all things to all as St. Paul would say in his letter to the Corinthians.

Yes, our society today needs teachers that can lead others to the right path and to the right choices. We must not abandon this mission of being teachers and catechists of the Gospel of Life. But we must also seriously consider what St. Paul VI said, “Modern man listens more willingly to witnesses than to teachers, and if he does listen to teachers, it is because they are witnesses.” Families today, including and especially the young people, need accompaniment in their journey. They don’t need more judgments and condemnations. To lead people to the truth, we must do so in love. Truth in charity. Walking together for life. This is where the Holy Spirit is leading us today. May we become active proclaimers of the Gospel of life together. Mabuhay ang pamilyang Pilipino! Sama-sama nating ipagtanggol ang buhay! Together, let us walk for life! Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Walk for Life – University of Santo Tomas, February 17, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ:

Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our hearts for the solemn commemorations of the Mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  And here we are again on our annual observance of staining our heads with ashes.

Para sa pagninilay natin ngayon, alalahanin natin ang dalawang bagay: ang abo at ang krus.

Una ay abo.  Sa buong taon, maingat nating inaalagaan at nililinis ang mga mukha, ulo, at buhok natin.  Gumagamit pa tayo ng sabon, shampoo, at ang kung anu-ano pa para lagi silang malinis, makinis, malambot, at maganda.  Pero sa araw na to, dinudungisan natin ng abo ang mga noo natin, tanda ng pagsisisi at paghahanda ng kalooban.

Naglalagay tayo ng abo sa ulo, bilang paalala ng ating abang kalagayan, paalala ng ating kahinaan, paalala ng ating kamatayan.  Lahat tayo ay mamamatay.  All of us will die, no exceptions.  All of us will one day have the ground above us.  All of us will one day turn to dust.  Kaya naman, wala dapat puwang ang pag-iimbot sa puso.  Let us not allow the delusions of self-righteousness, self-sufficiency, self-entitlement, and self-grandiosity to eat our hearts and cloud our minds.  As the Gospel today reminds us, let us pray and serve with humility, sincerity, and total dependence on God.

Ang abo ay paalala rin ng paglipas ng lahat ng bagay sa mundo.  Mga kapatid, wag tayong mahulog sa maling akala na forever ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Hindi forever ang pera at yaman; pwede itong kitain at ariin pero pwede ring manakaw o mawala.  Hindi rin forever ang poder at posisyon; pwede itong makamit at masungkit pero pwede rin maagaw o manghina.  Hindi rin forever ang kalusugan at itsura;lumilipas sila sa pag-usad ng panahon.  Ang mga feelings natin ay hindi forever; dumarating at nawawala rin.  Pati nga ang mga bundok at dagat, lambak at ilog, mga halaman at hayop, hindi sila forever.

Hindi mafo-forever ang mga bagay ng mundo, kahit pa anong pilit natin.  Pero minsan niloloko natin ang sarili natin.  Tinatago natin ang ating yaman, sa halip na linangin at ibahagi. Sinasakim natin ang poder, sa halip na gamitin sa wagas na paglilingkod.  Inaabuso natin ang kalikasan, sa halip na alagaan.  Nag-aadik tayo sa sarap at saya, o nagtatanim ng galit, o nag-iipon ng lungkot, o nagtatago ng takot, sa halip na magbukas at mag-alay ng sarili sa pagmamahal at pagmamalasakit. Kinukulong natin ang mga relasyon natin sa mga guni-guni nating expectations sa halip na maging bukas sa pag-uusbong ng misteryo ng ating kapwa.

Walang forever dito sa mundo! Dahil wala rito sa lupa ang forever.  Parang abo ang mga bagay ng mundo.  Kapag lalong hinahawakan, lalong nabibitawan.  At nakakarumi lang!

Pero, kahit walang forever sa lupa, alam nating hindi totoo na walang forever.  May forever, ngunit nasaan?Ang forever ang biyayang galing sa langit.  At ito ang dahilan kaya hugis krus ang abo na ipapahid natin sa noo natin.  Ang hugis krus ay paalala sa nag-iisang forever: ang pagmamahal ng Diyos, pagmamahal na walang hanggan, pagmamahal na walang pasubali.  Ito lang ang mapanghahawakan natin.  Ang totoong tumatagal at tumutuloy ay ang mahabaging pagmamahal at ang ganap na katarungan ng ating Ama sa langit. Huwag tayong mag-alinlangan. Tunay na darating ang Diyos na nagmamahal, nagdadalang-awa, at nagliligtas. Hindi niya tayo pinababayaan, dahil Siya ang totoong forever.

Ang paglalagay ng krus sa ating mga noo ay paalala sa nag-iisang totoong forever, paalala na kumapit lamang sa pagmamahal ng Diyos.  Ito lang ang mapapanaligan natin.  Ito lang maaasahan natin.  Even before any rejection or sin was possible, God has loved us first.  Si Lord ang first love natin, and first love never dies.  Siya lang ang totoong forever.

Dear brothers and sisters, this is the very heart of our Lenten observance.  We pray to turn to God.  We fast to be free from hypocrisy and worldly attachments.  We give alms to the poor to recognize the presence of God in those whose only hope is Him.  Ngayong Kuwaresma, umuwi tayo sa nag-iisang totoong forever.  Let us go home into the warm embrace of our loving God.  Amen. (Photo by Mio Angelo Hermoso/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Today, we enter into the beautiful season of Lent.  We bless the Lord who has brought us again into this time of preparing our …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Ash Wednesday Mass, Arzobispado de Manila Chapel, February 14, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated life; seminarians; the families, relatives, and guests of our ordinandi; all of you gathered today in this Abbey Church; and to our ordinandi, Reverend Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio:

In the early centuries of the Church, the ordinations of bishops, presbyters, and deacons were celebrated on a Sunday.  St. Leo the Great says, “It was on Easter evening and on Pentecost that the Lord poured out his Spirit on the apostles.  Consequently, the blessing of those to be consecrated should never be imparted except on the day of the resurrection, for Sunday is the day on which all the gifts of grace were bestowed.”

And so, it is very fitting that we gather this Sunday, the Day of the Lord, to celebrate this Eucharist and to ordain our brothers, Reverend Dom Martin to the Order of Presbyters and Dom Eugenio and Dom Pio to the Order of the Diaconate.  Let this place be like the upper room where Jesus appeared on Easter evening when he breathed the Spirit to his apostles.  Let our coming together be like the first Pentecost when tongues as of fire came and rested on the disciples.  Let us pray that Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio truly receive the Holy Spirit that makes them ministers of God and his Church.

It is also significant that we gather at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, the hour when our Lord gave up the Spirit, the hour of our redemption, the hour of great mercy.  In this Eucharist, we beg God to have mercy on us, especially on our brothers being ordained today.  My dear ordinandi, you will not be here if not for God’s mercy.  You will not be ordained today if God is not merciful.  A while ago, Abbot Austin testified that you have been found worthy.  But the truth is, you are to be ordained not because you are worthy, because you are not.  No one of us is.  You are to be ordained because we are “relying on the help of God and our Lord Jesus Christ.” Bunga kayo ng awa ng Diyos.  At kaya kayo inoordinahanngayon ay dahilkinakaawaan kayo ng Diyos. Kung hindidahilsaawa ng Diyos, wala kayo, walatayong lahat ditongayon.

Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, the readings proclaimed to us today tell the story of every person chosen by God – the story of being called and sent.  In the first reading, the Lord commands Moses to summon the tribe of Levi because they are being called and set apart from among the children of Israel to be sent to assist the priests, serve the community, and minister at the Temple.  In the second reading, St. Paul tells us that when God calls, he equips those he chooses with gifts.  And God sends them to use and share those gifts for the building up of the Church.  And in the Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples the fundamental truth about discipleship.  “It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain.” God calls and sends.

The Church beautifully celebrates the story of calling and sending in the rites of ordination.  The ordination is the ritualization of a vocation that leads to mission.  Every vocation starts with a call, an invitation from God.  Vocation is not self-presentation.  It is a loving and courageous response to a God who invites and calls.  That is why the ordination rites began with the calling of the names of the candidates and with their response, “Present.” This is not a mere roll call, like what we do in class.  My dear ordinandi, when your names were called, it showed that God’s call is very personal.  God calls you by name. God wants you. And God is very sure of who he is calling.  Siguradong-sigurado ang Diyosnakayo ang tinatawagniya.

And when you responded, “Present,” it does not only imply that you are physically here.  When you said, “Present,” you are telling God, “Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will.”

The ordination rites began with vocation, and it will lead to mission.  Through the laying on of hands and the prayer of the Church, through the vestments that will be donned on you, and the implements of ministry that will be entrusted to you, you are being sent.  That is why we conclude the ordination rites with the greeting, “Peace be with you,” the greeting of the risen Lord to his fearful disciples locked in the upper room before sending them to mission.  Later, we will also give you this greeting to assure you of Christ’s peace as you go to your mission.  Christ’s peacegives usthe courage to go where God wants us to.  Christ’s peaceenables us to face the many trials, oppositions, and even persecutions brought about by our fidelity to God.

From being called to being sent, from vocation to mission.  This is the life of every minister and every follower of Jesus.  In your particular way of lifeas Benedictine monks, Dom Martin, Dom Eugenio, and Dom Pio, you can live this out by being faithful to ora et labora.  Prayer is nothing else but being called by God to communion and intimacy with him.  Prayer is a vocation.  When you pray, you respond to a God who calls and invites you to himself.  And labora is nothing else but being sent to mission.  It is God sending you to work in his vineyard.  Let prayer, especially the Eucharist, be the powerhouse where you receive God’s strength to do your work.  And let your work lead you to a more meaningful prayer and deeper relationship with God.

I join the Benedictine monks in thanking the Lord for the gift of these new priest and deacons to your community.  And with you, I implore the maternal intercession of Mary, Our Lady of Montserrat, and Our Lady of Lourdes, and the prayers of our Holy Father, St. Benedict, for these our brothers so that, filled with the Holy Spirit, aware of God’s mercy, and following the examples of our Mother Mary and St. Benedict, they may be faithful in their vocation and zealous in their mission, that in all things God may be glorified.  Amen. (Photo File/RCAM-AOC)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024  

Abbot Austin Cadiz and the Benedictine monks of the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat; dear brother priests concelebrating in this ordination Mass; reverend deacons; brothers and sisters in consecrated …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Ordination to the Presbyterate and Diaconate – Order of St. Benedict, Abbey Church of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

It seems we can’t find what you’re looking for. Perhaps searching can help.

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; brothers and sisters in Christ.

Xin niankuae le.  Kong hei fa choi. Happy New Year.

It is my joy to be with you today as we celebrate the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time and the Lunar New Year or the Chinese New Year. This occasion calls families to gather and to express gratitude for all the blessings that they have received. My presence here is a manifestation of my earnest desire to be with your community, especially with our Filipino-Chinese families.

Allow me first to share this beautiful message from Pope Francis, “Today, in Asia and other parts of the world, millions of families are celebrating the lunar new year. I send them my heartfelt greetings in the hope that this feast may be an opportunity to foster loving relationships and acts of care to build a fraternal society.”

Indeed, this is a time for us to promote loving relationships in our homes and fraternal respect in our society. Our readings for today point us to the painful reality of discrimination and social exclusion in human communities. The book of Leviticus describes the process of diagnosis and penalty for leprosy. The person who is confirmed to be afflicted with this disease will live outside the community and will declare himself unclean. As long as the sore or symptoms are in the person, he will not be allowed to go back. Leprosy is not just a physical sickness. It is a social and psychological torture.

St. Paul in the second reading counsels the church of Corinth to avoid giving offense to the Jews or Greeks or the church of God. As much as possible, the Christians must please everyone in every way, not to seek their own benefit but that of the many. St. Paul, in other words, wants the Corinthians to promote a community spirit and not suspicion or hostility.

The encounter between Jesus and the leper in our Gospel from St. Mark is a powerful example to us of mercy and courageous acceptance that led to healing and restoration. The leper came to Jesus kneeling and begging, “If you wish, you can make me clean.” Behind this statement is the feeling of extreme loneliness and frustration. The leper knew that this is his last chance. He is begging Jesus to rescue him, to take him out of his suffering. What Jesus did surprised everyone because it was unthinkable at that time. He touched the leper. He did not only talk to him from a distance. He stretched out His hand and touched him.

Brothers and sisters, on this day of family reunions and honoring of your ancestors, Jesus is once again stretching out His hand to all of us. He wants to heal our wounds of division. He wants to touch our leprosy of indifference and apathy so that we can be made as one again. You may have heard of the word synodality, a word which means walking together or journeying together. I encourage your parish community to seriously consider this direction that Pope Francis has initiated in the universal Church.

Let us become a synodal Church in mission. Let us walk and work together so that the mission of telling the world of His love may be vigorously pursued. Your parish here in St. Jude has a great role to play in showing other parishes how to be synodal, and how to live out the Trinitarian principle of unity in diversity. I would like to challenge the Filipino-Chinese community to actively promote a culture of integration and inclusion, a culture of synodality and collaboration. Our world today needs more workers for peace and communion, architects and artisans of dialogue and mutual listening. Let us heal the world one act of love at a time, one touch of kindness at a time.

Once again, Happy New Year. Xin niankuae le.

May the Lord bless you with the abundance of His grace as we usher in the New Year. Amen. (Photo by Kyler Bernardo/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024  

Fr. Alex Vitualla, SVD, our rector and parish priest; Reverend Fathers and Brothers of the Society of the Divine Word; dear brother priests; beloved parishioners and devotees of St. Jude; …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Chinese New Year, National Shrine of St. Jude, February 11, 2024   Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ.

We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering us in this shrine, which truly marks our Filipino distinction as a pueblo amante de Maria.  We remember how Mama Mary gathered her beloved Filipino children to EDSA to rally and pray together for the sake of truth, justice, and peace in our troubled land.

My dear brothers and sisters, aside from its penitential character, Lent is also a time to prepare catechumens for Baptism.  The readings during Lent are meant to instruct them on Christian life.  Today, we learn about prayer.

Jesus warns his disciples regarding a misdirected understanding of prayer. We must not think that saying too much will make the Lord listen to us. This is dangerous.  This leads to self-righteousness.  We might think thatbecause I have put all my effort into praying sothe Lord should listen to me.

In prayer, we do not deal with a God whose mind we change.  Rather, it is God who transforms us in prayer.  When we pray, God touches us, and we are changed.  Our hearts are transformed.We do not change God in prayer.  Prayer changes us.  In prayer, God touches us.

God knows what we need before we ask him.  He knows what we need before we even come for prayer.

Prayer is an encounter.  Through constant prayer, we develop our relationship with God.  In any relationship, we must be willing to waste time with the beloved.  This is the secret that we learned from the Little Prince. The fox said to the Little Prince, “If you want to befriend me, you must tame me first.”  The fox asked the Little Prince to regularly spend time with him.  In the end, it was the heart of the Little Prince that was tamed.  He learned the great secret.  It is only when one is willing to waste time for the beloved, andspend time with the beloved – can a relationship grow.

Jesus teaches his disciples how to pray. Jesus teaches us how to pray. First, we acknowledge that even our desire to pray, even our ability to pray is grace coming from the Lord.  The old translation of a Preface in the Mass says this beautifully: You have no need of our praise, yet our desire to thank You is itself Your gift. Our prayer of thanksgiving adds nothing to Your greatness, but makes us grow in Your grace, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”  God is the source of all, including our prayer and all that we have and are.

Second, we acknowledge that God is the giver of all gifts.  We ask him to give us today our daily bread.  This teaches us to ask only for what we need and for what is enough for today.  When we desire more than this, we deprive other people.

Third, prayer seeks to heal relationships. Prayer must lead us to ask the Lord “to forgive us our sins” and to give us the grace to “forgive those who have sinned against us.

When we pray, we humbly recognize that God’s will should be done on earth as it is in heaven.  Prayer directs us to seek and obey God’s will.

Dear brothers and sisters, now is an important time to uphold our national dignity as pueblo amante de Maria.  Let us not allow EDSA to be a mere page in our national history.  EDSA is a religious and spiritual experience that cuts through time and inspires our life as a nation.  EDSA is not so much about the triumph of one party or dynasty over another; it is about the victory of the faith and heroism of the Filipino people, maka-Diyos kaya makabayan.  At EDSA, we showed the world that we are activelyengaged citizens who have the freedom and dignity to choose our nation’s destiny by coming together in prayer and solidarity.

Let this spirit of EDSA live on.  Let us take steps so that the next generations of Filipinos will call Mary blessed.  All the more, we need to pray the Holy Rosary as families and communities, and contemplate the holy mysteries in the life of Mary and Jesus so that they may transpire in our personal and social lives.  All the more, we need to express our faith in both private and public spheres, and let the teachings and commandments of God influence our national decisions.  All the more, let us turn to Our Lady for her guidance and protection, and seek her prayerful intercession for justice and peace in our nation and all over the world.

Mama Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us all.  Amen. (Photo by Maricar Santos/RCAM-AOC | Photogallery)

 

 

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024

Fr. Jerome Secillano, our dear rector, my dear brother priests and deacons, my dear brothers and sisters in Christ. We give thanks to God our Father this day for gathering …

HOMILY TRANSCRIPT | Manila Archbishop Jose F. Cardinal Advincula, Shrine of Mary, Queen of Peace (EDSA) Shrine, February 20, 2024 Read More »

Archbishop Advincula

Rev. Fr. Filemon dela Cruz, Prior Provincial of the Dominican Province of the Philippines; Rev. Fr. Richard Ang, O.P., university rector; my dear Dominican fathers and brothers; administrators, faculty, personnel, and students of the university; dearly beloved in Christ,

Together, we walk for life.

This is the theme we have chosen for our Walk for Life 2024. We want to highlight the fact that in life, we cannot walk alone. As we uphold, promote, and defend the sacredness of life and the dignity of every person, we cannot be alone. We need one another. We need to journey together. An African proverb tells us, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” Inde